April 27, 2017

Doug Tempel

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Minnesota

EducationDoug in forest

M.S. Wildlife Conservation – University of Minnesota, 2002

B.S.Chemical Engineering – University of Notre Dame, 1987

Research Interests

I am the Project Leader for Dr. Gutiérrez’s two current California spotted owl studies: the Eldorado Demography Study and the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project.  I am also seeking a Ph.D. in Natural Resources Science and Management (Wildlife Ecology and Management track) at the University of Minnesota.  For my dissertation research, I am comparing estimates of spotted owl population trends derived from two different methods: mark-recapture lambda modeling and territory occupancy.  In addition, I am developing quantitative methods for incorporating survey data into the Forest Service’s adaptive management program in the Sierra Nevada.

Publications

Tempel, D., V. Wright, J. Neilson, and T. Mildenstein.  2008.  Linking wilderness research and management-volume 5. Understanding and managing backcountry recreation impacts on terrestrial wildlife: an annotated reading list.  RMRS-GTR-79-vol. 5, U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

Tempel, D. J., W. D. Tietje, and D. E. Winslow.  2006.   Potential effects of sudden oak death on small mammals and herpetofauna in coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) woodlands.Pages 233-236 in “Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge.”  PSW-GTR-196, U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Tempel, D. J., W. D. Tietje, and D. E. Winslow.  2006.  Vegetation and small vertebrates of oak woodlands at low and high risk for sudden oak death in San Luis Obispo County, California.  Pages 211-232 in “Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge.”  PSW-GTR-196, U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Tempel, D. J. and R. J. Gutiérrez.  2004.  Factors related to fecal corticosterone levels in California spotted owls: implications for assessing chronic stress.  Conservation Biology 18(2): 538-547.

Washburn, B. E., D. J. Tempel, J. J. Millspaugh, R. J. Gutiérrez, and M. E. Seamans.  2004.  Factors related to fecal estrogens and fecal testosterone in California spotted owls.  Condor 106: 567-579.

Tempel, D. J., A. B. Cilimburg, and V. Wright.  2004.  The status and management of exotic and invasive species in National Wildlife Refuge wilderness areas.  Natural Areas Journal 24: 300-306.

Tempel, D. J. and R. J. Gutiérrez.  2003.  Fecal corticosterone levels in California spotted owls exposed to low-intensity chainsaw sound.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 31(3): 698-702.

 

Contact

Mailing Address:
University of Minnesota
Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
200 Hodson Hall
St. Paul, MN 55108

Office Address:
University of Minnesota
Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
174 McNeal Hall
Office Phone: 612-624-7709

E-mail: temp0059@umn.edu